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The "fall" vaccine can reduce the danger of getting infected with bird flu

The "fall" vaccine can reduce the danger of getting infected with bird flu

Experts believe that another flu epidemic is inevitable. The greatest danger is currently a combination of the avian influenza virus (widespread in birds) and the virus that causes influenza in humans. This "recipe" would be truly deadly for millions of people.

Experts believe that another flu epidemic is inevitable. The greatest danger is currently a combination of the avian influenza virus (widespread in birds) and the virus that causes influenza in humans. This "recipe" would be truly deadly for millions of people.
This fact is confirmed by the specialists of the World Health Organization (WHO), who say that there is always a possibility that this kind of epidemic will result in a pandemic, which will involve killing not only hundreds of people, but even millions, if the mutation will occur. Whether or not such a catastrophe will occur this year or in the next one is uncertain, but it will be known in the next 6-9 months, say WHO experts.


Avian influenza has approached dangerously close to Romania, the most affected areas, where millions of birds were slaughtered, being the Russian Federation and Kazakhstan. The worst is that the cold season is approaching, the most "vulnerable" time of the year for the outbreak of an influenza epidemic being between October and March. Bird flu has so far killed millions of flyers, but also 63 people, the latest case being confirmed in Indonesia.
But humanity is not well prepared to deal with such a catastrophe. and this because there is no vaccine for this disease yet. WHO currently has a reserve of 30 million doses of influenza vaccine, to be used if the number of cases increases alarmingly. But otherwise, each country will have to prepare.
Last year, only 1.2 million doses of free vaccine could be provided in Romania, given that at least 150 people per 1,000 inhabitants and at least half of the population at high risk of disease are recommended to be vaccinated. . During annual influenza outbreaks, 5-15% of the population is affected by upper respiratory tract infections. The groups most at risk of contamination, hospitalization and death as a result of this condition are the elderly and those with chronic diseases.
According to statistics, annual outbreaks generate between three and five million cases of acute disease and between 250,000 and 500,000 deaths each year globally. Most of the deaths caused by the flu from the industrialized countries are registered especially among the elderly over 65 years. Thus, a priority of the moment for the WHO, against the occurrence of avian influenza, aims to stop the spread of epidemics in domestic birds, this strategy reducing the possibility of human exposure to viruses.
"Vaccination of people at high risk of exposure to infected domestic birds, using existing vaccines effective against the types of influenza encountered in humans, can reduce the likelihood of infecting people with avian influenza," say WHO experts present at the regional meeting in Bucharest. Public information on the clinical course of human H5N1 avian influenza infection is limited to case studies recorded in 1997 in Hong Kong.
During that epidemic, patients had symptoms of fever, sore throat, cough, and, in some fatal cases, acute respiratory distress such as viral pneumonia. Antiviral medicines - some used for both prevention and treatment - are effective against forms of influenza A, especially in healthy adults and children, but have some restrictions. Some of these drugs are expensive and supplies are limited.
Source: Freedom