Comments

A new discovery in ovarian cancer

A new discovery in ovarian cancer

A new study published in the "Science Daily" shows that cells that normally aid in the formation of uterine tubes can lead to ovarian cancer by disrupting their genetic development process.

A new study published in the "Science Daily" shows that cells that normally aid in the formation of uterine tubes can lead to ovarian cancer by disrupting their genetic development process.
Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology, along with researchers at the Ovarian Cancer Institute, found that PAX8 protein is found both in cells involved in the development of uterine tubes and in cells that lead to ovarian cancer, but not in ovarian tissue. unaffected.
The discovery not only provides new diagnostic modalities and therapeutic interventions, but also opens new avenues for ovarian cancer research.


The study appears in issue 3 of the journal 'Gynecological Oncology'. "The discoveries we have made give us new insights into the molecular and genetic understanding of different types of cancer and emphasize the importance of considering cancer as a deviation from normal human development, due to genetic and epigenetic changes," said Nathan Bowen , a researcher at the Georgia Anti-Cancer Coalition and the Ovarian Cancer Institute (ICO).
Bowen and colleagues at ICO used cancerous and non-cancerous tissues, taken directly from the operating room to investigate the molecular profile of ovarian cancer tissue, to find out the causes of cancer, to arrive at a reliable diagnosis after performing the test. blood and to understand why these cancer cells are resistant to chemotherapy.
In 2003, a group of researchers at Stanford University who were involved in the study of breast cancer found that pairs of genes 8 are found only in ovarian cancer, not breast cancer.
Considering the results of Stanford research, those at ICO have begun to investigate the possibility that genes may be important markers in discovering and investigating the causes of ovarian cancer.
Researchers have begun to look for evidence of the existence of PAX8 (a protein composed of 8 gene pairs), a step before establishing that the gene is a biological marker for ovarian cancer.
PAX8 protein was found not only in ovarian cancer cells, but also in the secretory and uterine forming cells of the uterus. In addition, it was discovered and established that the protein is not in the normal surface epithelium of the ovary.
Bowen assumes that the cancer is caused by the PAX8 protein, which results in the proliferation of the adult stem cell population from the surface of the ovary, which ultimately results in ovarian cancer. In the embryonic period, when this gene is activated, it will lead to the development of the fetus's uterus, but when it is active in healthy, mature ovarian cells, which migrate into the ovary, ovarian cysts will form.
Normally, the growth of cysts is controlled by the feedback mechanism of the cells, which stops their growth, but in the case of cancer, when these feedback mechanisms undergo mutations, the cysts grow and get out of control, until metastasis.
"The new discovery is a pathway that can lead to the establishment of tumor treatments based on molecular profile," Bowen said. 'Biology is, in fact, an information processing system that generates finished products and most decisions about this finished product are made by cells, such as gene pairs 8.
Bowen will try to find out why the 8 gene pairs become active and where they are headed: to a decision-making gene or to a finite gene. "This is the most burdensome task of biologists researching cancer," Bowen said. "Now that we have sectioned the human genome, we have to figure out which of the thousands of genes are activated in cancer at the same time." This research was conducted with donations from the Georgia 'Anti-Cancer Coalition' and from the Laboratory of the Ovarian Cancer Research Institute.