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Moms with postpartum depression can be taught to become good mothers

Moms with postpartum depression can be taught to become good mothers

Treating post-partum depression may not be enough to improve the relationship between mother and child being only part of the equation, according to a study conducted in collaboration with several universities in North America. The other essential factor is the help that must be given to mothers to understand the behavior of newborns and their needs so that mothers can respond to their needs, said Dr. Robert Short, one of the study's co-authors, a psychology professor at the University of Edmonton, Canada. .

Treating post-partum depression may not be enough to improve the relationship between mother and child being only part of the equation, according to a study conducted in collaboration with several universities in North America. The other essential factor is the help that must be given to mothers to understand the behavior of newborns and their needs so that mothers can respond to their needs, said Dr. Robert Short, one of the study's co-authors, a psychology professor at the University of Edmonton, Canada. .
The pilot study that included 11 mothers with moderate to moderate severe postpartum depression and their children showed that when mothers were taught how to react to their children's emotions, they responded with a much greater interest in the mother's actions even if the depression of mothers does not improve.

Mothers were thus able to have a positive attitude towards their child even if they were feeling depressed, Short said. A percentage of 3 to 30% of mothers suffer from post-partum depression, which considerably damages the growth and development of the newborn, leading to behavioral problems at old age. This study shows that if you only insist on the mother's medical problem, this does not guarantee an improvement of the mother-child interactions essential for the normal development of the child.
Source: Sfatulmedicului.ro
March 20, 2007