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The language of babies, slowed down by the media

The language of babies, slowed down by the media


It seems that DVDs and children's tapes do not have any advantage despite the fact that the market is the opposite. In a study that included children between the ages of 8 and 16 months, the researchers found that watching DVDs and children's tapes may even delay language development, reports Reuters Health.
Specialists advise parents to have frequent conversations with their children from birth and continuing until at least 3 years old.
The researchers interviewed 1,008 parents with children aged 2 to 24 months about their children's language development and how their children spend their time, including the types of media they are exposed to.
The results showed that the language of infants between 8 and 16 months is underdeveloped because these children watch DVDs and tapes. Specifically, each hour per day of viewing was associated with a 17-point decline in a test that measures language development.
The specialists also found that those parents who read or tell stories to their children at least once a day increase their children's scores on these language tests. It seems that the period when children's videos affect the babies the most is between 8 and 16 months. In children between the ages of 17 and 24 months, no connection was observed between the type of media and language development.
Alina Sica
Editor
November 9, 2007