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How do you explain to your child where the babies come from

How do you explain to your child where the babies come from


All the children will wonder at one point where the babies come from, so if you have a child at home, it would be good to think ahead of time about a response appropriate to his age. Many parents get stuck when their children ask "Where do the babies come from?" and they end up giving answers that put them even more into the tangle (of the type "Brings them a stew"). The key to success in this case is honesty, within the limits of decency.
It is very important to talk to your child about this problem as soon as possible after asking the question. If the place or time is not right or you have not yet thought of an appropriate answer, tell him that you will discuss it later and keep your word.
Find out exactly what your child wants to know. For example, although the questions of a three- or six-year-old child may be similar, they may not be thinking about the same thing.
The three-year-old may want to simply know where to "bring" his or her future brother or sister, while a six-year-old will want to know how the baby got in your tummy.
Ask your child first a few questions to see how he understands the concept of "pregnancy" and what he really wants to know. When you answer your child, be careful what words you use. If you tell your child that you have a baby in your "belly" then you will have a new set of questions, such as "Where does the food arrive while the baby is there?" and if "Does the baby eat your food too?".
Using the wrong phrases can scare the child even more
Think about how you want to explain to them about the different parts of the body. Some people choose to use the correct names of body parts, while others use other names. The uterus can be described to a baby as simply a special organ in the mother's body where the baby develops until birth. The fact that you tell him he's in the tummy might scare him into believing he will have a baby there too.
Tell the child what he wants to know, but without too much detail
When they understand the basics, you can say more complex things. For example, to a small child who asks how he came up, an explanation like, "Well, I took a bit from my mom and a bit from my dad, I mixed them up and that's how you came up!" may be sufficient, but to a slightly larger child you may need to include in the explanation other details such as: egg, sperm, fertilization, sex, etc.
Explain the concept of intimacy during the course
Many children will ask "Can I see myself?" when you explain them about sex; tell your child that this is only for moms and dads and that it is done in privacy when they love each other very much.
Take the little one seriously
He does not laugh at him and does not make him feel bad that he asked and, above all, does not make it seem that this conversation is shameful.
Also explain the time needed for a baby to develop in the womb. You can also show her pictures with the baby in different stages of development. This is especially useful if you are trying to prepare the little boy for the coming of a brother or sister to the world.
Also, be as succinct and direct as you discuss these things with your child. If your discussion turns into a "sermon", he will lose interest and will not listen to you until the end.