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Children criticized too much communicate more difficult

Children criticized too much communicate more difficult

Young children who are verbally abused by adults may later suffer from problems with the brain's ability to process language, the conclusion of a study by a team of researchers in the United States, informs newscientist.com.

Young children who are verbally abused by adults may later suffer from problems with the brain's ability to process language, the conclusion of a study by a team of researchers in the United States, informs newscientist.com.
The study, conducted by a team of researchers at Harvard Medical School in Boston, Massachusetts, involved 17 volunteers who suffered serious verbal abuse in childhood, but no other form of maltreatment.
Along with them were selected 17 other volunteers from the same socio-economic categories and of the same age who had not suffered any form of abuse.
The tomography of their brains revealed that those who had been verbally abused in childhood had 10% less gray matter in the part of the brain associated with the language, the right temporal lobe, which contains a section responsible for hearing processing.

This area helps the brain to understand the tone of the voice.
The experts define by the term of "verbal abuse" the frequent denigrations and critical comments, which lead to the appearance of the feeling of inferiority and to the diminution of self-respect.
Source: The Event of the Day
October 23, 2006