In detail

Walking will keep you cool

Walking will keep you cool

Half an hour of movement a day halves the risk of cooling. Walk every 30 minutes on a fast pace and keep the colds out of the cold season, researchers at the US National Cancer Institute suggest.

Half an hour of movement a day halves the risk of cooling. Walk every 30 minutes on a fast pace and keep the colds out of the cold season, researchers at the US National Cancer Institute suggest.
The study, conducted by American specialists and published in The American Journal of Medicine, showed that daily movement strengthens the immune system and increases the level of cells that fight infections. But beware of excess because you will get opposite results. The researchers chose 115 sedentary, overweight and even obese Seattle women, who underwent a year-long exercise program.
Some of them did daily exercises, and the other, once a week, for 45 minutes.

At the end of the three months of study, the researchers observed that those who did daily exercises cooled twice as much as the others.
Sport improves leukocyte levels
"The results showed that a quick walk of 30 minutes a day can increase the level of leukocytes, cells involved in the fight against infections. The immune system of those who made daily moves was much stronger, which suggests that the prevention of colds begins with physical exercises, "says study coordinator Cornelia Ulrich, an associate at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle.
The important thing is that the exercises are done with measure, attract the researchers attention. Other studies have shown that excessive effort can increase the risk of cooling. A slight immunodeficiency felt after a severe workout could cause minor recurrent infections, coughs and colds and would promote sensitivity to viruses and bacteria responsible for minor gastrointestinal infections.
On the other hand, there are also voices that challenge the results of the study. Specialists Richard Ruffin and Paul Thompson of Hartford Hospital, Connecticut, do not exclude the possibility that the illnesses of those who did less sports were caused by certain infections and argue that more studies would be needed to prove the benefit of the 30 minutes. daily movement.
(Ramona Samoila)
Source: The Event of the Day
October 30, 2006